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Texas proposes bill to ban texting while driving again

The debate over banning texting while driving has gained some momentum in Texas now that a lawmaker proposed a bill to ban the dangerous driving behavior.

A Texas lawmaker proposed House Bill 63, which would ban texting while driving. The law would not apply to hands-free devices or when using a GPS. Texas already prohibits underage drivers from using wireless devices while driving and legislators want to strengthen the regulations against using cell phones for all drivers to reduce the number of car accidents caused by distracted driving.

Texting while driving has already been banned in 39 states and supporters of the proposed bill in Texas say that it is time Texas finally ban this dangerous behavior. Supporters of banning texting while driving say that reading or sending text messages while driving is very dangerous since it takes a driver's eyes off the road for several seconds and can cause serious and fatal car accidents.

While the proposed bill has many supporters, those opposed to the bill say that it would infringe on their personal freedoms and rights as a citizen. Opponents of banning texting while driving have also cited a study that said car accidents still continue to happen despite states banning texting while driving and that a ban does not prevent these accidents from continuing.

The dangers of texting while driving are well-known and they contribute to many car accidents in Texas and throughout the country. The lawmaker who proposed the bill said that banning texting while driving has been supported by the Texas Department of Transportation, insurance companies, and other safety awareness groups that want to stop distracted driving in Texas.

Supporters of the bill hope that this time around, the bill will be passed and signed into law by the governor to prevent distracted driving accidents in Texas.

Source: Dallas News, "Craddick introduces bill to ban texting while driving to Texas House Transportation Committee," Karen Brooks Harper, Feb. 26, 2013

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